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An Investigation of the Predictors of Youth Sexual Health Testing in Western Australia

Year

2020

Project status

Planning phase.

Ethics approval

Human Research Ethics Committee approval is being sought for this research.

Investigators

Ms Kahlia McCausland (Curtin University), Dr Jacqui Hendriks (Curtin University), Dr Roanna Lobo (Curtin University).

Brief overview

Between 2016 and 2019, SiREN conducted a regular research priority-setting process. This involved consulting with the SiREN Project Steering Group and the broader sexual health and blood-borne virus (SHBBV) sector to identify important research topics based on gaps in the evidence base and emerging issues. Arising from the 2019 SiREN research priorities meeting, the group identified 'increasing sexually transmissible infections (STI) and blood-borne virus (BBV) screening among young people' as one of the sector's key research priorities for SiREN to support in 2020.

STI and BBVs are responsible for a significant burden of disease in Western Australia, and young people (16-25 years) are disproportionately affected. As such, young people were named as a priority group in the Fourth National, and Western Australian Sexually Transmissible Infections Strategies.

Aim

This project aims to investigate the predictors of STI and BBV testing within young people (16-25 years) residing in Western Australia and determine the feasibility of conducting a periodic survey.

How to participate

If you are aged between 16 and 25 years old and currently live in Western Australia you are eligible to participate. 

More information coming soon.

Social media handle

You can follow us on Facebook at @WAYouthSexHealth

Project outputs and impacts

This survey will facilitate the collection of Western Australian specific data which can be used to inform public health strategies, service provision, prevention programs, and health education.  Results of this research may assist sexual health services to align with broader public health goals articulated in the national STI and HIV and strategies aimed to reduce the burden of disease and improve the quality of sexual lives of young Australians.

Contact

Please contact Kahlia McCausland (Project Coordinator) for further information at kahlia.mccausland@curtin.edu.au or (08) 9266 7382.